I live in Northern Hemisphere and it’s Winter. Do I Need to Supplement Vitamin D? (2021)

Winter is upon us so is the risk of vitamin D deficiency and infections. Now, is there a time when most people ask I live in Northern Hemisphere and it’s Winter? Do I Need to Supplement Vitamin D?

Vitamin D, which is formed in our skin after exposure to sunlight and is also found in oily fish (mackerel, tuna, and sardines), mushrooms, and fortified dairy and non-dairy substitutes, is important for the health permanently. Humans need vitamin D to stay healthy and fight infection. The irony is that in winter when people, I live in Northern Hemisphere and it’s Winter. Do I Need to Supplement Vitamin D? (2021). Most people don’t get enough of it. So what proportion should we take? Should we take supplements? How can we get more? And who needs it the most?

I’m a medical microbiologist and immunologist who studies vitamin D’s role in immune cells. My group has been trying to figure out why the system contains vitamin D. Receptors that determine which cells within the system can use vitamin D. This helps the system fight infection and reduce inflammation.


Where to Get Your Vitamin D

I live in Northern Hemisphere and it's Winter. Do I Need to Supplement Vitamin D? Where to Get Your Vitamin D
Article: I live in Northern Hemisphere and it’s Winter. Do I Need to Supplement Vitamin D?

Vitamin D is called the sun vitamin because it is produced within the skin after sun exposure. The equivalent UVB rays that cause sunburn also produce vitamin D. Sunscreen, darker skin pigmentation, clothing, and reduced daylight in winter decrease the skin’s ability to form vitamin D. People who experience the most important seasonal changes in vitamin D levels are fair-skinned people who live in northern regions of the US and in higher latitudes around the world where there is little or no daylight in winter.

People of color and those who reside at higher latitudes. On the other hand, are more vulnerable to low vitamin D levels. Because darker skin prevents UVB rays from generating vitamin D. Dark-skinned persons are more likely than fair-skinned people to have low vitamin D levels all year. Even dark-skinned persons, however, have reduced vitamin D levels in the winter.

Adults should take extra vitamin D from food and/or supplements in the winter. In addition to eating vitamin D-rich foods, to get a minimum of 600 IU of vitamin D each day. People with dark skin or who avoid the sun should get additional vitamin D each year. -round.


Vitamin D Is Important for Bones and Your Microbes

I live in Northern Hemisphere and it's Winter. Do I Need to Supplement Vitamin D? Vitamin D Is Important for Bones and Your Microbes
Article: I live in Northern Hemisphere and it’s Winter. Do I Need to Supplement Vitamin D?

Initially, doctors believed that vitamin D was primarily beneficial to bone health. This was due to the fact that vitamin D deficiency caused bone disorders in children and adults, such as rickets and osteoporosis. In the 1980s, however, scientists discovered that immune cells possessed vitamin D receptors.

According to studies done by my group, vitamin D is essential for maintaining digestive system health. Vitamin D deficiency reduces susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn’s disease, and intestinal and lung infections in both animals and humans.

According to my colleagues and myself. One of the ways vitamin D works is by keeping the bacteria in the gut healthy and happy. Vitamin D helps to reduce inflammation throughout the body by increasing the number and diversity of bacteria in the gut.

Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with inflammatory bowel disease in humans. Inflammatory bowel disease patients in Japan had greater symptoms in the winter than in other seasons, according to research.


Why Is Vitamin D More Important in Winter?

I live in Northern Hemisphere and it's Winter. Do I Need to Supplement Vitamin D? Why Is Vitamin D More Important in Winter?
Article: I live in Northern Hemisphere and it’s Winter. Do I Need to Supplement Vitamin D?

Humans are more susceptible to illnesses and spend less time outside in the winter. The exact amount of vitamin D that healthy individuals should receive is debatable. Some experts prescribe between 200 and 2000 IU each day. In the United States, the Institutes of Medicine advises 600-800 IU per day for adults, whereas the Endocrine Society suggests 1500-2,000 IU per day for optimum vitamin D levels. People’s capacity to produce vitamin D when they walk outside during the winter is diminished. Therefore getting at least 600 IU of vitamin D per day from food or supplements would help keep vitamin D levels at summer levels.

But like many other things, too much vitamin D is often harmful. Vitamin D toxicity is not the result of excessive amounts of sun or food. Because of the danger of carcinoma, dermatologists and other health professionals do not recommend unprotected sun exposure to give vitamin D more flavor. Instead, they suggest supplements. But vitamin D toxicity can occur if a person takes too much.

The experts who establish the national vitamin D intake for the US recommend that adults do not take 4000 IU per day of vitamin D to avoid toxic side effects. Vitamin D helps you absorb calcium from your diet. But when vitamin D is too high, calcium levels in your blood rise, which can cause kidney disorders.

Your gut bacteria will be healthier and you will be more immune to infection and inflammation throughout the year if you consume more vitamin D during the winter.


To read more similar articles click here


Thanks for visiting our Website. If you appreciate our work, kindly show us some support in our comments section 🙂 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.